Scouting 101

Abdul Latip Isnin

A 1976 President Scout

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

I joined Scouting in my Secondary Two after my good friend enticed me into Scouting, as an exciting and adventurous ECA which I would love it. I took his words and joined the 1612 Teluk Kurau Secondary Scout Group. The rest is history as Scouting had played a big role in shaping my life and career till today.

What attracted you to Scouting?

The Team Spirit, Outdoor Activities and Unknown Adventure that Scouting afforded every member. It was like a discovery channel. There was always something you could learn and skills you picked up which became meaningful and helpful throughout my life.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

It has to be winning the Katong District Scout Championship in 1972. That was the 1st time Teluk Kurau Secondary School became District Champion as we had never topped any event prior to that year. In 1971, the group was at the bottom list of the District. Under the Guidance of our Troop Leader Effendy Rajab (current ED of SSA) we made a pledge to train very hard and geared up to win something the following year. We trained almost every day for almost a year. The bonding among the Team members was the bastion of our strength.

Beyond the wildest dream, we emerged as Katong District Champion, clinching the titles to almost all the events. We later on took honors at National Level as well.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

It goes to show that if you have a dream you must go for it, but dream cannot become a reality without hard work. In our case, the untiring and dedicated leadership that inspired and guided us was a tremendous spur to our achieving the goal.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

"I promise to do my duty to God" and to Keep the Scout Law! These have guided me to the right values to always be fair to other people and be honest and sincere in whatever I do.

Above all to always have a heart to help others.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

If you like Adventure and Outdoor activities, striving at the same time to work as a Team, you will enjoy Scouting.

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

From 1972 at Teluk Kurau Secondary School

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

1612 Scout Unit, Katong District

What was your last Scout "rank"?

1616 Venture Scout Leader

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?

Yes Singa or Lion

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

I'm a very easy going individual who is happy to help others, always giving my best in whatever I do. Above all, I am not afraid of failure. I treasure the friendship with my fellow scouting friends. They remain to be my close friends till now and forever. As the sayings goes 'Once A Scout, Always A Scout"

Alphonsus Gregory

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

I was given Scouts as a CCA in 1986 when I first joined SJI as a teacher. The main reason (I later found out from the Brothers)

It was given Scouts as my CCA was because I had written in my resume that I enjoyed outdoor activities and camping.

What attracted you to Scouting?

As I said earlier, I was given Scouts as my CCA. The only impression I had of scouts was from my elder brother (who attained the King Scout Award -Malaysia) who come home camp after camp; dirty, smelly and full of muddy stains. My thoughts were, “What a horrible CCA to be in!” Little did I know that I was to be in-charge of a Scout Unit years later. What made me don the Scout Uniform and eventually attend the Adult Leader Training Courses were the constant encouragement from the Adult Volunteer Leaders who were serving the Unit. They taught me all the knots and rope work and pioneering skills I have today. In a special way I am very thankful for them as they introduced tome a new way of life but most importantly a most unique and effective way to develop youth to become ‘men of worth.’

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

It was in 1988, in Pulau Ubin. We were at our annual camp at Nordin Beach. All the scouts had settled down to sleep at about 2300h. As usual I had my nightly chats with my Adult Volunteer Leaders. In the thick of our discussion, a loud cry for help pierced the silent still night. We ran to the source of the cries and to our surprise found out that one of the scouts ‘sleep walked’ into the sea. I was ever thankful that he woke up as soon as he felt the water at his feet and he screamed for help, realizing he was in ankle deep water. I was petrified at the thought that he could have drowned while sleep walking. I took no chances of it happening again that night as we took turns keeping watch over him.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

One very important lesson I learnt was to ensure that I get all the necessary information about my scouts, especially if they have any disorders or idiosyncrasies. If they do have any and if it compromises the safety of the scout or his fellow scouts, I will advise the parents for him to not attend the camp or the activity.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

‘Doing my Best’ has always motivated me to do better than what I could do yesterday and what ‘more’ I could do.

How did this "value" support you in your career/ what you are doing now?

I am a teacher/facilitator, have always been and will always be. Giving my best to my career as a teacher/facilitator, as a Scout Leader and now as a Commissioner, all focuses on the fact that those under my charge develop to become the better person he desires to be.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

Scouting in my opinion is the most ‘holistic youth programme’ you can ever get today.

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

1986

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

I was the SL for the 03 Hippo Scouts of SJI from 1986 to 1992. The Hippo Scout Unit was closed down for stream lining and administrative purposes and so I was instructed to take over as the SL for 04 Pelandok Scouts and then as GSL in 1997 to date. SJI has moved from the Stamford District to Tanglin then to Newton then to Queenstown and now we belong to the Clementi District.

What was your last Scout "rank"?

I am currently the GSL of St Joseph’s Pelandok Scout Group

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?

I was not a scout in my school days. My scouting name is ‘Stallion’

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

I strongly believe in giving every opportunity for all youth to develop themselves to the fullest. I engage and challenge my scouts under my care to move out of their comfort zones to take on new challenges. I often look out for the potential in individuals and offer them opportunities to grow. My greatest fulfillment is to see my charges become ‘men of integrity’ and ‘men for others’

Andrew Chua 

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

When I was a teacher at Kim Seng East Primary School.

What attracted you to Scouting?

I was assigned as a teacher leader in charge the Scout Group in the school as an Extra Curricular Activity.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

During one of the camps sometime in 1970 held in Punggol (then a swampy area), I fell into a hole meant as an animal trap past mid-might when the participants were engaged in a game. No one came to my rescue as it was during the wee hours of the morning. Fortunately, I was not hurt as there was no sharp object placed in the hole. I was left there and slept in the hole for the night. The constant loud barking of dogs woke me from my sleep. The barking also attracted some passers-by who came to my rescue.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

I had to maintain my patience and remain calm even during trying situation. Indeed I was not at all panic as I was sleeping in the trap through the night.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

A scout is to be trusted to do their best. In the same manner I trust in the compassion of human nature in wanting to render assistance to fellow human beings in distress/mishap.

How did this "value" support you in your career/ what you are doing now?

Even though I have fully retired as an Educator more than 10 years ago, I have continued to serve as the GSL of Catholic High Scout Group as I continue to trust that every scout can be nurtured and developed to embrace that value.

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

A reserved person who prefers to keep a low profile behind the scene. I hope that my contribution to the scout movement’s worthy cause will indeed make a difference to the lives of those youths who came under my leadership. In a nutshell, “I aspire to inspire before I expire”.

Antong Shahrudin

Honour & Integrity

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

First joined as a Cub Scout in a primary school and went on to be a Scout, Venture Scout, Rover Scout and finally an Adult Leader and a member of the Scout Guild.

What attracted you to Scouting?

I was at first attracted to the scout uniform. Besides most of my friends had joined the Scout Movement at the same time.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

There were just too many memorable incidents that took place during my scouting journey. To pen down every details will be like writing a book.

My group of old scouts still meet now and then and we still reminisce the good old days. One of the many good things that I can still recall was when I attended the Silver Jubilee at Chinese High School in Bukit Timah Road as a cub scout. I remember it was held at a huge field. The field was filled with cub scouts and I felt so proud to be a part of it. One of the other things that I can remember well was the round island canoeing. I took part for the first 3 round island canoeing expedition. Each year the distance grew longer and longer due to land reclamation. There were many challenges during the expeditions. We had to carry the canoes across the causeway. To paddle the canoe with the big ships sailing around was exhilarating. Also at each trip we saw many scouts arguing with their partners initially but they became friends again at the end of the expedition.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

There were just too many lessons learnt. I am still learning as Assistant Chief Commissioner in one of the 4 Areas. I think when I stop learning is when I

stop being a scout.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

I have not broken up the scout promise and law. I believe it should be kept intact. As for me the scout promise is all about honour. And the scout law is all about integrity and being a good servant leader. And like the motto says we need to be prepared.

How did this "value" support you in your career/ what you are doing now?

Honour and integrity has always been my moral pillars and you need to be prepared for anything especially the worst case scenarios. It has certainly has help me a lot in my career and my day to day life.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

I will tell them that Scouting is a way of life. It is not just about camping or campfire. It goes beyond. Apart from being adventurous and daring enough to

try different kinds of things, the scouting activities serve to cultivate caring, sharing and friendly values. From which year were you involved in Scouting? Joined as a cub scout in 1969

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

I have always been with Katong District, beginning as a Cub Scout all the way to a Rover Scout.

What was your last Scout "rank"?

I’m currently Assistant Chief Commissioner for South Area

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?

I was given the scoutcraft name as Omaha Water buffalo by Mr. Tan Hua Chiow, my then Venture Scout Leader.

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

I am told to be very adventurous and an also an “adrenaline junky”. It is true; I just believe that everyone needs to try any beneficial and useful things in one’s lifetime, at least once. Then only then can one be able to learn and share from experiences.

Arumugam VKK

 

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

Took it up as an extra curricular activity in Primary 2 to spend my Saturday mornings. My parents did not want me to wake up late or waste my Saturday mornings watching TV. At that time, only Scouts, Brownies and Red Cross were the only groups of people coming back to school on Saturday for activities.

What attracted you to Scouting?

The uniform.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

Getting my District Commissioner’s Badge in 1998 when I was in Primary Six. It was my first personal milestone in Scouting.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

The journey that I went through to attain the District Commissioner’s Badge laid the foundation of Scouting for me and enticed me to continue Scouting in Secondary School and beyond.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

A Scout makes friends, establishes and maintains harmonious relations.

How did this "value" support you in your career/ what you are doing now?

Scouting has come to make me realize the importance of having friends in our lives. To me, friends determine how successfully we really are. They are the ones who you can count on in times of need and they won’t feel shy about telling you what is right and wrong. They tell you want to need to hear and not what you want to hear. This is especially good in work. Friends will offer a hand in times of need and you do not need to go about asking for their help. Friends understand and know you better compared to office colleague who tend to just judge you by your performance and how you portray yourself.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

I would share my overseas Scouting trips. The experiences, the friends I’ve made and the things I’ve done over there with other Scouts.

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

1994

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

Jing Shan Primary School, Mayflower District Beatty Beaver Scout Group, Beatty Secondary School, Toa Payoh District Sapphire Rover Crew, Serangoon Junior College, Serangoon District Serangoon Eagle Scout Group, Serangoon Secondary School, Serangoon District

What was your last Scout "rank"?

Serangoon Eagle Guild Chapter Chairman

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

Scouting has been more than a hobby or an activity for me. Instead it has become my way of life. The Promise and Law had been and will always be my guiding principles in life.

Bay Yew Chuan

Engineer and company director

They call him Black Horse

Bay Yew Chuan started off as an engineer with an MBA. He quickly chalked up an impressive track record in the energy industry, manufacturing, logistics and trading. Some of the companies he has been working with or advising included Amcol Holdings and Alternative Energy Ltd.

He has been an active Rotarian, being a board member of the Rotary Family Centre and chairman of the Ayer Rajah-Rotary Club Student Care Centre.

Both being an achiever and a good citizen came from the Boy Scout values of being self-reliant and yet, at the same time, believing in good fellowship.

 

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

At school, in St. Anthony’s. I joined the Mojags as a cub in 1952/3.

What attracted you to Scouting?

Outdoor life and games.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

When I receiving my Queen Scout certificate from Lord Rowallan in Bankstown Sydney during an Australian Jamboree.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

Scouting is worldwide. I learnt to make friends from all over the world. I found out what good fellowship is all about.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

I learnt to be independent.

How did this "value" support you in your career or in what you are doing now?

Helps me to lead an independent life and be successful in what I am doing. I am also more spontaneous in offering help to friends and others in need.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

Join to have fun, make more friends, learn to be more self-reliant and be prepared always.

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

1952/3.

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

5th Troop in Stamford District.

What was your last Scout "rank"?

Patrol Leader.

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?

Black Horse (first class name!).

Desmond Chong
Kok Hwee

Risk Strategist

A hunter and his targets

His core professonal skill has always been to help organisations analyse situations and manage them – whether as an Intelligence Officer with the SAF, group director in risk management for Meritus Hotels and Resorts or global incident strategy advisor at Microsoft Inc.

To do these jobs, one has to work very hard to get all the facts, be able to see the bigger picture and know what the targets are. Desmond Choo Kok Hwee learnt all these as a Boy Scout.

 

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

I got involved in scouting in primary school. A couple of classmates were keen to join and they brought me along. Our school’s Cub Scout Pack was like the “biggest” ECA in school at that time. (We were known as Cadet Scouts then. It was changed to Cub Scouts in the earlier 2000s).

What attracted you to Scouting?

Besides the fact that I was there with my friends, the experiences of the great outdoor were what attracted me. My friends in school were always going for camps, hikes and when they came back from those, they would talk about their experiences and I really wanted to try it out myself.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

Job week when I was a Cub Scout. I didn’t grow up in a well-to-do family and I remember that my school bag was torn. My Cub Scout Leader saw it and told me that if I did well for my job week, she will reward me with a new school bag. That taught me a lot about work.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

I’ve learnt that if we want something, we need to work for it. There is no such thing as a free lunch. That experience taught me a lot about the value of hard work. It has been my guiding principle since.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

“I promise to do my best” is probably one of those which will stand out for me.

How did this "value" support you in your career or in what you are doing now?

This value is also another guiding principle. When I’m entrusted to handle a certain project, I make sure I do my very best. 100% effort from start to end and ensuring that I deliver what I have promised to do. Sometimes, when I’m down and beaten, I will remind myself that I have promised to undertake a task and I should pick myself up and continue working.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

Scouting is not just another activity; it is a movement which prepares our youths for what’s ahead.

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

From 1992 to 1997.

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

Cheetah Scout Group, Mayflower District.

What was your last Scout "rank"?

Senior Patrol Leader.

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?

I didn’t have one when I was a Scout but I was given the call sign “hunter” when I was in the intelligence corps because of the relentless focus on getting my “targets” during operations.

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

A young person who believes that happiness and satisfaction spring from being able to contribute to the well-being of those around you and the community in which you live in.

Dr Boey Mao Jie

Dental surgeon
He loves the badges!

Boey Mao Jie is passionate about the three groups that he has spent much of his life with. The hyperactive dental surgeon, youngest to attain the Certificate of Oral Implantology from the University of Frankfurt, is a proud “true-blue ACsian”. He is equally proud about Rovers which he helped to revive. And, of course, becoming a Boy Scout which he describes as one of the best decisions he ever made in his life

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

I got involved in Scouting back in primary school as a Cadet Scout. I was “forced” to join as my parents thought that Scouting would drain my energy from me as I was a hyper-active child. They also wanted me to learn to be independent, thus it seemed like a good choice.

What attracted you to Scouting?

The badges!! Of course when I was much younger during my primary school days I was fascinated with the wide variety of the badges available for the Scouts to attain. Also the uniform was much nicer than the other uniformed youth organisations in my school. As I moved to secondary school, the main attraction became the guides! (Ha, ha!)

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

There were too many memorable incidents that I had as a Scout. But the most recent incident that I remember vividly was when a group of Rovers that I have never met personally came up to me after I handed over my term as the 1st National Rover Council Chairman, and told me that they are very appreciative of the work that my council had done for the Rovering section.

Previously, the Rover section was very fragmented and there was no aim or focus. My council and our advisers spent numerous hours and effort to bring up the Singapore Rovering scene.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

That even when people have doubts about the possibility of success in trying to revive the Rover section; if you can gather like-minded people who believe that with a sound plan things will work, we can work together and achieve the results that other people say are not possible.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

A Scout makes friends and establishes and maintains harmonious relations.

How did this "value" support you in your career or what you are doing now?

As a dental surgeon in private practice, I have the privilege to come in contact with a lot of people of varying personalities and backgrounds. The ability to make friends is a value that taught me to respect every individual and try to get to know him or her better. At the end of the day, I find my line of work more of a service than a technical solution to my patient's oral problems. I am a firm believer in the saying : '”There are no strangers, only friends we have not met”.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

Joining and staying in Scouting is probably one of the best decisions I made in my life.

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

1998 - when I was in Primary 4 in Anglo-Chinese Primary School.

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

ACS (Barker Road) Scout Troop.

What was your last Scout "rank"?

Baden-Powell Award Holder and Rover Commissioner.

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?

No.

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

Extrovert, fun loving, clear about what I want and things I want to achieve, sporty and health-conscious. Living my life with these principles taught to me to be a scholar, an officer and a gentleman in Anglo-Chinese School and, as a Scout, to be loyal, friendly and prepared.

Dr Kumaran Rasappan


The day the chicken’s head refuses to come off

One camping experience taught Dr Kumaran Rasappan, 27, never to just believe what others tell you. It is far better to do the thing yourself and find out first-hand. This DIY determination, sharpened by his years in Scouting, has helped him achieve at least two dreams so far. He has realised his ambition to be a doctor (he’s now working in the Orthopaedics Department of Tan Tock Seng Hospital). And he just conquered Mt Everest in May 2012.

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

I joined as a Secondary One student when I was in Raffles Institution.

What attracted you to Scouting?

The fact that I could I try out everything and not be confined to just one activity or sport unlike many other extra-curricular activities.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

It was during my year one investiture in 1997. It was held in the Punggol Adventure Centre run by MOE then. We had backwoodsman cooking and the seniors were teaching us how to kill live chickens. They said that we had to just flick the chicken’s head and it would come out clean away from the body. When the seniors demonstrated, that was far from true. They were tossing and turning the chicken round and round but the head never came away from the body. Instead in the end, they decided to strangle the chicken to death and chop off the stubborn head.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

Being prepared in life. I would never be the person I am today if it were not for Scouting. It taught me how to be a person, to meet new people and stand up to the adversities that life throws at us no matter what. And it made me find true friendships which lasted through so many years.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

Form the Scout Hymn – Be the Best… The best that you can be...

How did this "value" support you in your career or what you are doing now?

It made me realise my full potential. Not comparing myself with others but just becoming the best that I could ever be.

f you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-Scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

If you believe in true friendships and an experience that would last you a lifetime, you’d never regret joining Scouting.

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

Since 1997 till present. I was still involved with my group since I officially left Scouting in 2002 as a Venture Scout. I am still involved in helping out my group till today.

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

01 Raffles Scout Group. Toa Payoh District.

What was your last Scout "rank"?

Venture Scout Leader as a Volunteer Adult Leader (VAL).

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words.

Practical, down to earth fellow. I love following my dreams and seeing them through and making them come true. I don’t believe in what people tell me, what I can or cannot do. I will try it out for myself before I come to a conclusion.

Dr Mohd Effendy Rajab


“Make your dream come true”

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

In 1966 in primary school where I joined as a Wolf Cub in Kaki Bukit Primary School (Katong District)

What attracted you to Scouting?

Mainly, the uniform and the various proficiency badges including the opportunity to carry a scout knife, ropes and whistle on the uniform, which makes you feel somewhat, great.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

I was selected to be part of a 12 member contingent to the 13th World Scout Jamboree in Japan in 1971.

The Jamboree campsite was at the foot of Mt Fuji, a spectacular view from the camping areas. A strong typhoon hit the Jamboree site one day resulting in massive evacuation of campers. Our sub-camp was flooded with rain water flowing into the tents, soaking most of us. It was cold and wet. The Singapore Contingent was temporary evacuated to a nearby school. One quiet evening in the school, venture scout Richard Tan, picked up his guitar, which he had brought along and played a flamenco piece “Malaguena”. Shortly after, the caretaker of the school came in and entertained us with a lovely Japanese folk song “Kojo Nosuki”, He sang with full of emotions. These two songs were a life changing event for me. I made a promise that one day I would like to play these two songs on the guitar. Some 4 years later, this dream came true when I was able to earn enough money to take up guitar lessons at the Yamaha Music School. It was the beginning of a love affair with the guitar and I continued learning to play classical and flamenco pieces over the next 20 years.

Till this day, each time when I play these two songs, it brings back fond memories of the Jamboree and the people I met.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

If you have a dream or desire, go for it. Make it happens. One example is my desire to earn the PSA. I stayed focus and work towards achieving it and was presented in 1974. That’s what I learnt…the need to persevere in the face of difficulty to achieve one’s goal. This is in line with one of the Scout Laws: “A scout has courage in all difficulties”

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

To do your very best and never, never to give up hope. I learnt more through failures than successes.

How did this "value" support you in your career/ what you are doing now?

It taught me to be resilient in whatever I do, never ever to give up hope to realize my desires and dreams. I was a late developer and did not do well during my formative years in schools. It was much later at the age of 33 that I decided to go back to school and aimed to be the best that I could be, academically. I made a promise that I would want to get a doctorate. Eleven years later, I attained what I set to in achieving the pinnacle of academics qualification - Doctor of Education. This educational journey has made me appreciate the value of knowledge and more so now as an Associate Lecturer/Faculty to add value and touch the lives of adult learners. There are three types of people: People that watch things, happen People that wonder what’s happen and People that make thing happen

By and large, effective leaders make things happen. Beyond any doubts, Scouting has helped me to make things, happen. It teaches me the value of hard work and perseverance, which is achieved by having a positive outlook in life, focusing on what you want and taking action to make it happen.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

Scouting builds confidence and resilience for life

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

1966 Wolf Cub/Cub Scout 1968-71 Scout 1972-73 Venture Scout 1974-79 Venture Scout leader & Rover Scout Leader 1979-80 Assistant District Commissioner (Katong) 1981-88 District Commissioner (Katong) 1988-90 Area Commissioner (East) 1991-02 National Training Commissioner

2000-02 Executive Director, Singapore Scout Association 2002-05 Director of Adult Resources (World Scout Bureau-Geneva, Switzerland) 2005-06 Deputy Chief Commissioner 2006- Executive Director, Singapore Scout Association

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

1610 Kaki Bukit Primary School (Katong District) 1612 Telok Kurau Secondary School (Katong District) 1616 Paus Open Venture Scout Unit (Katong District) 1621 Todak Rover Crew (Katong District)

What was your last Scout "rank"?

Troop Leader in Telok Kurau Secondary School “Singa” Scout Group

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?

Penyu (a Malay name for Turtle)

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

A lifelong learner who loves challenges and who believes that you can achieve anything you set to do if you develop a positive outlook in life.

Edieusdi Bin Ahmad

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

I got involved in Scouting as it was offered as a co-curricular activity in Serangoon Secondary School. The display done by the scout group was spectacularly done and thus captured my interest.

What attracted you to Scouting?

Scouting attracts me simply for the reason of its belief in camaraderie beyond borders. Scouting friendship extend beyond nationality, skin color, race and gender while being part of this gargantuan group that each one of us can identify with.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

The most memorable incident during scouting for me was the journey back home from Project Orion 3 which I was the team leader.

The group faced with an accident when the bus veered of and overturned, down a ravine in the morning of 1st July 2011.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

I think the key lesson which I learnt is to expect the unexpected. Anything can happen at any time and in Scouting, we do have this belief of ‘Be Prepared’. We need to be resilient in our thinking and actions in other to face any ordeals we might have.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

A Scout makes friend, establishes and maintains harmonious relations

How did this "value" support you in your career/ what you are doing now?

Being in the hospitality industry, having the ability to make friends with people from various backgrounds will certainly make it easier to connect with others especially with foreign guests.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

I will always share my experience in the 11th International Youth Gathering for Cultural Exchange and Civilization Recognition held in Yemen. I would tell him/her how international scouting is and what makes it attractive to people worldwide.

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

2002 onwards

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

Serangoon Eagle Scout Troop, Serangoon District

What was your last Scout "rank"?

Senior Patrol Leader

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?’

Bouncer. Due to my obesity and constantly winning wrestling matches.

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

A jack of all trades. Having great interest in many areas due to inquisitive mind. Friendly and jovial individual.

Gabriel Tham

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

In Secondary School when I 1st join Scouts as a CCA

What attracted you to Scouting?

Those tall pioneering structures that was built for the Sec 1 CCA orientation, and the activities that the scouts would be doing, like outdoor cooking, kayaking & Knotting.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

When I got my President’s Scout Award in December 2007, going to the ISTANA, shaking the President’s hand was a great honour, and being the only 1 from a neighborhood school in my batch.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

As the recipients of the President’s Scout Award were usually from branded school, I learn that everyone can excel as long as you have the will to.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

A Scout Has Courage in all Difficulties. As it help me a lot during my journey as a PSA candidate, whenever I feel like giving up, I always remind myself that I have to persevere on and have courage in the difficulties I faced.

How did this "value" support you in your career/ what you are doing now?

It tells me not to easily give up when doing anything, and to give my best at all times.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

Scouting has trained me well to be prepared in whatever I do.

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

2002 when I was in Secondary 1

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

Whitley Scorpion Scout Group(2212) , Ang Mo Kio District Punggol Phoenix Scout Group , Serangoon District

What was your last Scout "rank"?

Assistant Venture Scout Leader

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?

Not yet.

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

I am what I am today because of what scouting has taught me. Once I set my sight on something, I will do my best and strive to achieve that goal. And lastly never say that something is impossible even before trying, and never be afraid to fail, you can always pick yourself up and try again.

Gavin Pah

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

My first-hand experience with Scouting was in 1991 at Zhonghua Primary School. Since then i've never looked back.

What attracted you to Scouting?

The adventurous activities.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

In 2007, I lead a group of Rover Scouts to the South Korea, for the DMZ Peace trekking trip. This was the first time that South Korea Scout Association opens the annual DMZ peace trekking trip to overseas delegates. During the trip, we were fortunate to experience many rare sights that are not open to the public-at-large. Understand and experience their military life at the frontline and have better insight of the importance of their roles.

Is a wonderful initiative adopted by the Korean Scout Association, it enhances the national pride among the Scouts, and given them a different experience in National Education of their nation.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

I promise that I will do my best.

How did this "value" support you in your career/ what you are doing now?

Trying our best in what we are doing at. We will try out best and never give up.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

Scouting is not about knots, camping, footdrill. Scouting is about finding your strength and makes it works the best out of it.

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

Since 1991

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

Currently in Cuon Scout Group

What was your last Scout "rank"?

Assistant Group Scout Leader

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?

Laughing Kookaburra

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

Being a self-motivated and committed individual, I believe in doing my best in whatever I do as this is also being responsible to the people around me and myself. I am always prepared for the challenges that lay before me and willing to learn the ropes of new things.

Gregory Cai Zhengyong

• Studied Medicine at NUS 2004-2009
• Served as MO I/C 3SIR from Jul 2011 to Jul 2012
• Currently pursuing postgraduate studies

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

Signed up as a CCA in Sec1

What attracted you to Scouting?

Hearing my Pri Sch classmates share their Scouting stories, and wanting to experience them myself

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

When I had stop pursuing the PSA in favour of my A-levels, after 2 unsuccessful attempts at ASPIRE. I resolved to continue Scouting as a leader, because we learn more from our failures than our successes.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

It is the journey that counts, not the goal. Too often, we take our achievements for granted, and forget how we got there.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise & Law) which would stand out from the rest?

"A Scout has courage in all difficulties".

How did this "value" support you in your career/ what you are doing now?

I'm a doctor with MOHH now. Scouting has taught me how to persevere in difficult situations, especially when work starts piling up.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting to a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

Scouting is not just a CCA; it is a way of life.

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

1998

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

Hwa Chong Scout Group (previously The Chinese High School Scouts) - Bt Timah District

What was your last Scout "rank"?

APL

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?

no, we were all addressed by our normal names.

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

Once I get tasked to do something, I will sometimes pursue it to the point of stubbornness. Other times, it is my personal dedication that drives me to do what I do. Ultimately, the most important thing is to do what's right.

Hoo Chuan Yang 

A Scout’s Journey – from Singapore to Wilmington and back again by District Commissioner Hoo Chuan Yang

I was with the Stamford 01 Raffles Scout Group in Raffles Institution from 1980-1985. In those 6 years, I was first a Scout, then a Venture Scout and finally a Rover Scout. Before that I was a cadet scout (now called Cub Scout) for 3 years in the 2213 Cadet Scout Unit from Farrer Primary School. While I was still somewhat engaged with 01 Raffles in my first year of National Service (e.g. helping out with the Group Training Camp or going for the Sarimbun overnight just before enlistment), I have not been back to the Group or Scouting since 1986.

It had always been my dream during and since my Scouting and boyhood days that I would one day hike the mountain trails and camp by the streams/rivers that we see Scouts do in other countries like the United States (US). Even in the 1980s, Singapore was fairly built up and there was a lack of “nature” where we can indulge our Scouting activities in. This dream was to stay dormant for 25 years till Feb 2011.

In the course of my work with DuPont Company, I was assigned to a global IT role (but still living in Singapore) in Jan 2009. As part of this global role, I was required to travel frequently to Wilmington in the US where the corporate headquarters of DuPont is located. Wilmington is a small city in the US state of Delaware, situated between the cities of New York in the North and Washington DC in the South, roughly 2 hours by car in each direction.

My trips to Wilmington required me to be there for at least 3 weeks and up to 6 weeks at any one time and I am usually there 3-4 times a year. I had done all the tourist things in my earlier trips to Wilmington like visiting tourist attractions and outlet shopping and was starting to engage in solo hikes around state parks in Delaware, Pennsylvania and Maryland (Alapocas, Brandy Wine Creek, Fort Delaware, White Clay and Fair Hills). State Parks are parks or other protected areas managed at the state level in the US. They are typically established by a state to preserve a location on account of its natural beauty, historic interest, or recreational potential. I was working on a global project with my US co-workers when I innocently asked one of them (Ron Carrick, who happened to be my project leader) in Oct/Nov2010 on where are the best places to hike around Wilmington. Ron recommended a few places and even suggested that I join his scout troop (Troop 29, DelMaVar Council) that coming weekend for their monthly outdoor activity which happened to be hiking. I had to turn it down as I was not prepared but promised him that I would join them in their next outdoor

activity which was a campout cum city hike in New York City in Feb 2011.

Ron Carrick (on left) and Chuan Yang (on right) at a fund raiser for BSA Troop 29 during May 2011.

Scout Troops in the U.S. are usually sponsored by community based entities like churches. I have even heard of a Scout Troop sponsored by prison authorities for juvenile offenders. Troop 29 is sponsored bythe Red Clay Creek Presbyterian Church in Wilmington, Delaware and we make use of the church facilities for our meetings and storage

of troop equipment. The troop meets every Monday evening for 1.5 hours starting at 7 pm and there is one monthly outdoor campout (with different activities for different months like hiking, mountain biking, backpacking, shooting, whitewater rafting, ice fishing, community service projects etc.). These monthly campouts usually start on a Friday at 5.30 pm and end by 2 pm on Sundays. There is also a big camping event (of 7 days duration) every year for the troop during summer in August called the Summer Camp which is similar to our Annual Camp in 01 Raffles.

One of the most striking differences between the scout movement in the USA and Singapore is the level of adult involvement in any typical scout troop. According to online information, the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) is one of the largest youth organizations in the US, with 2.7 million youth members and over 1 million adult volunteers. Notice the ratio of 1 adult to 3 youths. Usually it is a family affair with fathers joining their sons in the same troop throughout the entire duration of a scout’s

participation in the troop with some fathers even staying on after their sons have aged out. Even the mothers are not left out; they usually help out with the troop committee looking after finance, administration and logistics. Take Ron’s family as an example; his oldest boy had just aged out in 2011 for boy scouts but continued serving as Junior Assistant Scoutmaster. Ron himself is Assistant Scoutmaster (ASM) and his second son, Kyle, was elected as Senior Patrol Leader (SPL) in the same year. Ron’s wife, Kim was doing the finances for the troop. As for me, I started out as a uniformed adult leader in the role of troop committee member. Scouts in the US take pride in being scouts and being in uniform. So was I when I put on a Scout uniform for the first time after 25 years!

My first campout with Troop 29 was in Feb 2011 and it was a city hike of New York City with the troop camping over atthe Staten Island Scout Camp. As per any campout, we assembled at 5.30 pm at our church and made our way from Wilmington to the Staten Island Scout Camp, a drive of 2.5 hours. I was one of the designated drivers taking the scouts in my rented car which was an 8-seater mini-van (or MPV in the Singapore parlance). The US weather in February is usuallythe peak of winter and though I was fully prepared for winter in an office work environment, camping during winter would prove to be a different matter altogether. Given my previous scouting and National Service military experiences,

I thought I was prepared for anything but in Scouting andas in life in general, we can never stop learning to be prepared.

Thought it was not snowing, the ground was thick with ice and the troop had to move our gear over that ground to our camp area. For this campout, we did not use tents but were sleeping in adirondack shelters instead (see above).Though the weather was forecasted at 25 degrees Fahrenheit (or -4 degrees in Celsius), the temperature was actually 10 degrees Fahrenheit (or -12 degrees in Celsius) due to the high winds that were blowing. This was my first time camping outdoors in such low temperatures and even in Singapore, the lowest temperatures we were used to hover around 25 degrees Celsius (not Fahrenheit)! As I settled down to sleep that very first

of my first camping trip as a scout in 25 years, I was fully clothed in my winter clothing and tucked into 2 heavy duty sleeping tents. It was cold and it took me a while before I fell asleep. Getting up was another matter as it takes the body some time to get warmed up and get going. Having a hot cup of coffee never felt so good…I survived the second night and went on later at a different campout in Mar 2012 to camp out 2 more nights below freezing point thereby earning my first Frostbite Camper award. I also found out later from Ron that he and the other adult leaders were worried that I would not make it through my first winter camping. But then again, a Scout has courage in all difficulties.

For the other campouts, 3 boys were sharing one dome tent while the adults had their own individual tents. Usually we would place a tarp (or groundsheet) first on the ground before setting up the dome tents so as to protect the floor of the tents. Inside the tents, we would place sleeping pads below our sleeping bags. Compared to what we used to do when I was a scout, this is luxurious as we tended to

sleep cowboy style (i.e. no shelter) with only a poncho on the ground.

For meals during campouts, we use a variety of methods and they are prepared at a patrol level. For evening snacks, we tended to have a combination of ready to eat food like cookies, crackers etc. For breakfasts, we would use the gas stove to prepare hot meals and also prepare our packed meals for lunches. Dinners were the highlight of the day as we would use Dutch ovens and prepare proper meals with interesting recipes. For one campout at Camp Horseshoe, we had beef stew as the main course and pineapple upside down cake for dessert. Of course, there was washing and cleanup to be done afterwards. The adults had a patrol of our own and we usually eat well due to innovative recipes. Our patrol patch is of a rocking chair. See below.

compared to Singapore Scouting in 1980s, there are several unique differences. There is generally less regimentation involved but US scouts are no less serious about Scouting than any scout in the world. In fact, I would say the US has probably one of the best Scouting programs worldwide. First year scouts are formed into their own patrol so that they can learn and develop as scouts together. Adult troop advisors are also assigned to each patrol (including the first year scouts) to provide advice and sometimes guidance. This is a unique feature of the US scout movement where adults are heavily involved with the scouts and the organization of various activities and events. Patrol leaders are usually elected by their fellow scouts for six month

periods and not appointed as in Singapore. I was fortunate enough to be invited to speak to the troop twice about my Singapore Scouting experiences. The first time, I spoke about my time in 01 Raffles from a scout to venture scout and finally rover scout. There were many similarities as well as differences with US Scouting. For my second speaking engagement, I brought along my old scout uniform from Singapore. I think the boys were thrilled by what I shared with them at least that was what Ron had said.

As I got more involved with Troop 29, the scout in me resurfaced. Perhaps it was a case where I may have officially left the scout movement in 1980s but Scouting did not leave me. To be a good role model for the scouts, I started taking and completing the appropriate online courses to become a trained Troop Committee Member and Assistant Scoutmaster. As I write this, I am halfway through to becoming a trained Assistant Scoutmaster having completed the Introduction to Outdoor Leaderships Skills course over a weekend in March 2012.

I am now at an age where I want to make a difference by giving back. I remembered what Scouting meant to me when I was growing up and my 6 years with 01 Raffles has been and still is a very significant part of my life. I honestly do not remember the subjects I had studied when I was in school but my memories of 01 Raffles are still with me. So at the end of 2011, I went to the Singapore Scout HQ to sign up as a member of the Singapore Scout Guild which is a scout alumni association. I had also asked about volunteering my services to Scouting and it was suggested that I get in touch with

the teacher in charge of the Group and came down to the school to meet up with the current and previous batches of Group Council members in Jan 2012. My first official activity back with 01 Raffles was the 2012 Group Investiture cum Overnight in February. I went and purchased the required uniform for an adult leader and was in uniform for the entire event. There was also a talk after the investiture to brief parents of new scouts on what to expect and I was introduced as an old boy who had come back to help. After the talk, a father came up to me and asked me if I can remember him. I scratched my head for a while and he said he was a secondary one scout when I was a group council member in 1984. His own son is now in secondary one and with Hawk patrol. At the particular moment, I was overwhelmed emotionally though I may not have showed it. It was as if I had gone full circle and that I am now truly home.

James Soh

PBM MBE
Member, Scout Council

Mr James Soh, Executive Director of the National Youth Achievement Award (NYAA) Council, has been a Scout all his life. He began his journey as a Club Scout while studying in Alexandra Primary School. He continued as a Senior Scout throughout his secondary years with the 1905 Scout Troop at Queensway Secondary School.

After leaving school, he took a break from scouting as he established himself in his career.

In 1993, he was invited by Dr Ee Peng Liang, President of the Singapore Scout Association, to be a member of the Scout Council and he has served in the Scout Council till today.

Mr Soh is highly respected for his work in the youth sector both within Singapore and in the international arena. He credits this foundation to his Scout teachers, Mr Billy Goh and Mr Woo Ying Wah, who taught him to respect everyone, including our environment. He is also a fine example of an individual having qualities such as compassion, teamwork and the willingness to serve. These values inculcated in his early scouting years have proved to be very useful in his life and have certainly put him in good stead as the Executive Director of NYAA.

Over the years, Mr Soh's leadership and contributions were recognized both by the Singapore government, International Agencies such as the United Nations, Commonwealth and the APEC amongst many others.

 

 

In 1998, Mr Soh was awarded the Commonwealth Youth Services Award - Asian Region, in recognition of his leadership and contributions to the region. In 2000, Mr Soh was conferred the Silver Lion Award by the President of the Republic of Singapore and Chief Scout H.E Mr S.R Nathan. In 2010, Mr Soh was awarded the Singapore Scout Association's Centennial Medal (Gold) for his leadership and contributions to the Scouting Movement in Singapore by Deputy Prime Minister for Defence, Mr Teo Chee Hean, on the SSA's 100th Anniversary Celebration.

Besides scouting, Mr Soh has also been in leadership positions in numerous organisations both in Singapore and overseas. He is the Chairman of the Keep Singapore Beautiful Movement (KSBM), and the Tampines East Community Club Management Committee, People's Association. He is also the Co-Chairman of the APEC Voices Leadership Council.

In 2007, Mr Soh was also conferred the Public Service Medal (Pingat Bakti Masyarakat) by the President of the Republic of Singapore during the National Day Awards Investiture Ceremony. Among the many other accolades he received are The Green Leaf Award and the Preserve Planet Earth Award in 1993 for his outstanding contributions to environmental protection and nature conservation.

Mr Soh continues to be a role model for young people in Singapore and around the world by being an inspiring leader who after all these years still continues serves his community with all his heart.

 

Dr Jeffrey Ho
Kai Kwong

President's Scout & a Life time Rover

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

My father used to bring me and my brother for camping , fishing and doing outdoor activities when we were young. He had also told me stories about Scouting but he did not wear any uniform. I also did not join Scouting in Primary school as there was no unit in the school. So it was natural that when I started my secondary school in The Chinese High School in 1981 , I chose Scouts as my first choice for ECA. It was very much later in life when I became a Trainer with the National Training Team that I found out my father was a Woodbadge holder for Cadet Scout section through researching the archives of Woodbadge holder in preparation of Woodbadge reunion.

What attracted you to Scouting?

Initially it was the outdoor activities and opportunity for leadership development. Later in Scouting , it was the Scouting methods, espirit de corp and values for Life that attracts me to continue with Scout movement.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

One critical event was in 1982 when I was a Sec 2 Scout with The Chinese High School Scout Group. We were participating in an Annual Group hike across Pulau Tekong. Pulau Tekong was still open to public then. It was my first Group hike and my Patrol Leader did not come along for this hike. As Assistant Patrol Leader , I have to lead my members to go on while I find it very difficult task in motivating them as they are tired themselves carrying heavy backpacks. Soon, our Patrol trail very far back from the main Group and got lost.

We were very tired , afraid and exhausted. The sky darkened quickly due to heavy rain and we were stranded in an old cemetry. We sat in the dark, wet & cold with our torch on. One of our patrol members said that he felt like quiting Scouts and the sentiments seems to share among us. Suddenly, I remember the yarn given by our Group Scout Leader Mr Chin Peng Loi regarding our Scout Law the week before – Scout has courage in all difficulties and all Scouts are brothers. I share this yarn with our fellow patrol members and it seems to have rekindle our courage. We decided that it would be up to ourselves to find our way out. Soon we work together as a team and muster all our basic topographical skills to find our way out. Our Patrol was fortunate to make contact with the Venture Scouts sent by our Venture Scout Leader Mr Lee Tai Hui to find us.

Later in the evening, our Asst Scout Leader Cheong Peck Chong gather our patrol and gave us a yarn over a small Camp fire and told us stories about challenges from Baden Powell. (Later in life , I found out these stories are from “Scouting for Boys”) . The stories he told us was quite touching and he explained that Scouting is much more beyond senseless camping and hiking. He also had commended us for our courage and teamwork despite the odds. This incident strengthen our bond between our patrol members and gave us an experiential learning on practising Scout Law in life. Our Unit Leader's yarn had also given a true insight into Scouting education on values. It has also teaches us the importance of caring for others. Care for your fellow brother scouts and the care of adult leader to their youth members. It also stressed the important role of Adult Leader in the unit especially in the internalisation of our Scout values in our youth members.

This incident had changed my perspective and attitude towards Scouting.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

I realised the importance of Adult Leader's role even though we always champion for youth leadership. It was important that the Adult Leader should be well trained , knowledgable and should show empathy and care for your youth members. It can be a great game changer even if it was just a simple pep talk by the fireside. On the other hand, we need to have “Courage in all difficulties” and to be ready for all challenges even if the challenges seem too difficult to bear. It was through encouraging each other that as a team we move forward together.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

“On my honour , I promised to do my best.”

How did this "value" support you in your career/ what you are doing now?

This had been my personal motto throughout all my endeavour. In my academic studies , I put in my best to enter National University of Singapore Faculty of Medicine and graduated in 1993. Furthering my post graduate training in Family Medicine , Occupational Health , Hyperbaric & Underwater Medicine and Aviation Medicine. I challenged myself to achieve in different field by attaining my Master of Business Administration degree in year 2000 and started my business in 2003. I have volunteered my services for The Chinese High School Scout Group & SSA Headquarters and trained several President's Scouts & Leaders.

They have in turn nurtured several generations of Leaders and Top achievers. I have also contributed to the Swimming fraternity and help trained several swimming instructors so as to promote water safety and water survival. Most important of all, I have learn to do my best in caring for others. Hence , it influence my choice of career as a practising Family Physician and continue to serve our community through the Scout Movement.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

Scouting is Education in Life

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

Youth member : 1981-1984 Senior Patrol Leader

1985-1986 Venture Scout Unit Executive Committee Chairman Benjamin H Sheares Scout Scholarship (1985) President's Scout Award (1986) 1987-1990 Rover Scout / Baden Powel Award (1989) Group : The Chinese High School Scout Group 1987-1992 Assistant Scout Leader 1993-1996 Assistant Venture Scout Leader 1997-2007 Venture Scout Leader 2007-2011 Assistant Rover Scout Leader 2011-current Assistant Group Scout Leader Unit : Nanyang Primary School Pegasus Cub Scout Unit 2006-2013 Assistant Cub Scout Leader / Parent volunteer

SSA HQ National Training Team: 1988-1997 Cadet Leader Trainer 1997-2007 Assistant Leader Trainer 2010-2014 National Training Commissioner 2007-current Leader Trainer SSA HQ National Programme Council : 1999-2001 Assistant Venture Scout Commissioner 2001-2004 National Venture Scout Commissioner 2005-2009 National Programme Commissioner SSA HQ National Programme Council : 2005-current NAssistant Chief Commissioner

Singapore Scouts Foundation : 2010-current Fellow Singapore Scouts Guild : Founder Member of The Chinese High Scouts Chapter & President's Scout Chapter International : Founder member - Association of Top Achiever Scouts - World (Singapore Chapter) Vice Chairman , World Organization of Scout Movement Asia Pacific Region Programme / Membership Growth / Adult Support Subcommittee

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

2205 / Tanglin 05 / The Chinese High School Scout Group (Currently known as Hwa Chong Scout Group) Tanglin District – now defunct (Currently Bukit Timah District)

What was your last Scout "rank"?

Assistant Chief Commissioner (Membership Growth) Vice Chairman , World Organization of Scout Movement Asia Pacific Region Adult Support SubCommittee Assistant Group Scout Leader , Hwa Chong Scout Group

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?

“Glowing Light” - given to me by my Scout Leader after I had attained my Woodbadge. To be the light for youth leaders in Scouting

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

A life time Rover at heart. It was in Rovering that I discover more about Scouting despite being a President's Scout in Venture Scouting. The Rover programme broadens my understanding through interaction with fellow Rovers from other Units as well as other countries when I attended the 2nd Rover Symposium in Japan in 1989. Reading of other BP's work such as Rovering to success and Aides to Scout Mastership as well as Woodbadge training strengthen my Education in Scouting values and philosophy. Serving the community and helping others through our Rover projects was impactful for my personal development. Hence , I have experenced the benefit of living out the Rover motto of “Fellowship of open air and service”.

Jimmy Lau

Veteran air show organiser

The day Jimmy outboxes a bully

Catapulting off and landing on an American aircraft carrier in the Andaman Sea? Jimmy Lau, the man behind the highly successful Singapore Air Show, did that on the USS Independence. The enterprising and courageous event organiser can also recall how he outboxed a bigger-sized bully at a Scouting camp. Always be prepared, he says, citing the Boy Scout motto.

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

Joined Scouting when I was in Primary 4 at St Michael’s School.

What attracted you to Scouting?

I liked the rugged outdoor activities it promised.

The khaki uniform with its smart rolled up scarf also attracted me and I still think it’s a better looking uniform than the present one!

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

Nothing very thought provoking but the one incident that I remembered very clearly was a boxing match which was held at one of our camping trips. I was matched up with a resident “bully” in our troop, someone better-built than I. I have never tried boxing until then, stayed away from any fights. But on that day, I boxed like my life was dependent on it and won my bout. A sense of great pride and achievement came over me that day.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

That there is a place and time for everything, including taking on that “fight” with someone who has been provoking most of us.

I thought that my Scout Masters were very perceptive in pairing us as they were obviously attuned to what was happening.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

The Scout Motto, “Be Prepared”, is the most important value. It has guided me in all my working life till this day.

How did this "value" support you in your career or what you are doing now?

As an exhibition and conference organiser, there is no better value than to be prepared for all eventualities. I am always over-prepared than being under-prepared so as not to be caught off-guard. In organizing events, anything that can go wrong, will go wrong, so I organise and hope for the best, and be prepared for the worst!

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-Scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

Enjoy and you will eventually learn the values of being a Scout because nothing else would prepare you for life more than Scouting.

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

From 1966 to 1971.

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

2104 District

What was your last Scout "rank"?

Patrol Leader

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?

Cannot remember!

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

Unassuming, a hard worker (not so much about working long hours and such, but I work hard being a detailed person;) I empower my staff but I am always prepared to roll up my sleeves and jump into the fray when the need arises. I believe in work life balance, especially these last five years and I try to promote this by introducing policies in the office to help encourage this among my colleagues.

Johnathon Ng

• HR experience in both, unionised and non-unionised, manufacturing and service sectors
• APAC leadership role in an MNC at a relatively young age
• Demonstrated agility and ability to work effectively with all levels of employees

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

I am noted for being an energetic leader who holds long-term views on human resource management. While having a successful run in my career, I manage to strike a balance between family and work.

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

Got involved in primary school – P5

What attracted you to Scouting?

Scouting, in my view, is uniquely different from the rest of the CCAs available in the school.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

During a camping trip in Pulau Ubin, a mid night rescue call was activated by the scout leaders to rescue a friend who has fallen into hole. None of us realize that this was purely an exercise and are supposed to use all our wits to rescue the friend.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

Always be prepared and teamwork is key to any activity being successful.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise & Law) which would stand out from the rest?

Be Prepared

How did this "value" support you in your career/ what you are doing now?

It allows me to think ahead and prepare for any eventualities.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting to a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

It is uniquely different and the experiences prepare you for life.

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

1985

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

Can’t remember. For Primary School, it is a scout troop with Jurong Primary School and For Secondary School, it is an eagle scout troop with River Valley High.

What was your last Scout "rank"?

Patrol Leader in secondary school

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?

Nope

Justice Kan Ting Chiu

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

1958

What attracted you to Scouting?

To participate in the activities, and enjoy the fellowship

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

Patrol Leader to a new patrol

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

How to lead, and to promote teamwork

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

Self-reliance

How did this "value" support you in your career or in what you are doing now?

It helped me to think for myself

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

It was a valuable part of my growing up

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

1958-1959

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

Troop 16 (Pearl's Hill School)

What was your last Scout "rank"?

Patrol Leader

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?

No

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

I try to behave honourably and contribute positively in what I do

Justin Ng

 

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

Scouting wasn’t my choice! Because I was placed in Chinese Dance by default, I have no choice to take up Scouts as my CCA.

What attracted you to Scouting?

What attracted me to Scouting were the opportunities available. Back when I was still a Secondary 1 student, I was exposed to the many skills in my progressive booklet. I find it interesting with the badge scheme and was determine to achieve my progressive badges. Aside to that, I was appointed as the Senior Patrol Leader where it gave me many avenues to lead and learn human relation skills.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

Back when I was Secondary 3, I was pulled out from my lesson by my current Group Scout Leader for a tough scolding for missing Scout meetings. Gradually when I grow up as an adult, my GSL became a good friend of mine.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

It was a good 15 minutes lecturing that changed my attitude of being responsible. Knowing that as a Senior Patrol Leader, setting a good example was important for my peers and juniors to learn from.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

"I promise that I will do my best"

How did this "value" support you in your career/ what you are doing now?

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her? This value is a very good value and motivation line that I always think of when I do things. By not targeting at scoring 100% but putting in my very best to do things well will left me with no regrets and at times arriving at better results. If I would to share this with one, I would share this “Just do your best and when you know this is your best, you might arrive at something you least expect.”

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

Since 1999

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

Tampines District, Oneida Scout Group (East Spring Secondary School)

What was your last Scout "rank"?

During my scouting days, I was a Senior Patrol Leader. As of now, I’m a District Scout Leader of Tampines District. Back in my own Group, I’m an Assistant Group Scout Leader

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?

Not a nickname but my Scouting Name… Wisdom Keeper

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

I would describe myself as a very determined and highly motivated person. I enjoy the working with others and able to see things in perspective.

Kevin Tan Yew Lee

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

I first got involved in Scouting back in 1970 when I was in Primary Three, and studying at the now-defunct Farrer Primary School. It was the start of the year and some older Cadet Scouts went from class to class recruiting new members. When I heard that they went camping, I decided to join. Of course I had to get permission from my parents, and that night, I went home and asked my father if I should join the Scouts. It was then that I discovered for the first time that my father had been a Scout as well; and a First Class Scout at that. So, the next day, I joined the 2213 Farrer Scout Troop. My Akela then was Mr Tan Boon Tsair, a very dedicated and friendly English teacher who cared a lot about the boys. Later, we had Mrs Loh Lye Lin as an Assistant Akela. Another important Scout leader in the school was Mr Foo Jiong Kew. Interestingly, I later became colleagues with Lye Lin and Jiong Kew in the Training Team. We remain good friends.

What attracted you to Scouting?

Without a doubt, it was the romance and lure of camping, sleeping outdoors with friends and sharing a great time with them through the games we played and the things we learnt. I did not think the uniform to be a major attraction as the jersey we wore made us look rather sloppy and the synthetic tetoron material used made us hot and sweaty. The badges were a great attraction as well, but really, it was the activities and the desire to camp outdoors.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

That would be impossible. I was actively involved in Scouting for some 30 years. There were just too many memorable incidents or events.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

We learn something from every one of our activities. We learn a new skill, and we learn about how to work with each other. We learn about others, and most importantly, we learn something about ourselves.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

If I had to pick, then there are three ‘values’: (a) To be the best that one can be; (b) to have courage in all difficulties; and (c) to help other people. Of these, I consider the last to be the most important for Scouting prepares us for a life of service.

How did this "value" support you in your career/ what you are doing now?

I suppose you never ever stop being a Scout. Scouting becomes part and parcel of my way of life so all the values we hold dear became my personal values as well. Does it ‘support’ my career? Yes, but in that it guides me. Scouting values remind us that it is important to do the right thing rather than that

which is expedient. This may or may not help one’s career, but it will make the path you tread a more virtuous and dignified one.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

The best non-formal education you can hope for to prepare you for life.

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

1970-1973: Cadet Scout (Sixer), 2213 Farrer Primary School Cadet Scout Unit 1974-1976: Scout (Assistant Patrol Leader), 2102 Raffles Scout Troop 1977–1979: Venture Scout, 2102 Raffles Venture Scout Unit 1982–1986: Assistant Venture Scout Leader, 2102 Raffles Scout Group 1984–1988: Cadet Leader Trainer, Singapore Training Team 1987–1988: Group Scout Leader, 2102 Raffles Scout Group 1990–1991: Auxillary Scout Leader 1992–1995: National Programme Commissioner 1996–2006: Auxillary Scout Leader

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

Please see above

What was your last Scout "rank"?

National Programme Commissioner

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?

I don’t suppose I had a nickname, but my Scout name was ‘White Bear’ or simply ‘Bear’.

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

A tough, practical, straight-talking idealist with no patience for political machinations and hypocrisy.

Kuo Pao Kun

(1939-2002) Famous Singapore Playwright

In 1989. Kuo received the Cultural Medallion for his contributions to theatre. He also received the 2002 Excellence for Singapore Award, 1990 ASEAN Cultural Award and the Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres by the French government in 1997.

A worthy failure is better than a mediocre success.

Kuo Pao Kun is perhaps Singapore's greatest dramatist and arts activist. He was a bilingual English and Mandarin playwright who was a pioneer of multidisciplinary, multilingual and multicultural contemporary theatre in Singapore. He was also an influential educator and enabler who established The Theatre Practice, The Substation and the Theatre Training & Research Programme, and brought artists from different cultures and disciplines together.

Despite being detained without trial for over four years in the late 70s, he became the strength of Singapore theatre in the 80s and 90s and forged a body of work built on humanistic ideals. Although he passed away in 2002, his institutions continue to nurture generations and his theatre work, which has at its heart a true sense of self and a wider humanity, still invites audiences to think, feel and question. (Tribute SG, 2012)

Lee Tai Hui

Queen’s Scout

Tai Hui’s enduring and lifelong passion

Today we call them President’s Scouts, the highest local rank in Scouting. Previously, they were Queen’s Scouts. Lee Tai Hui was a Queen’s Scout some six years before Singapore became self-governing. How’s that for life-coping and survival - two important skills he picked up as a Boy Scout?

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

I joined scouting in 1951 as a scout in the Chinese High School. Since then, there was no turning back.

What attracted you to Scouting?

At that time, we had only few choices. I chose scouting as I preferred the adventurous and outdoor aspects of scouting. And, of course, the feelings of camaraderie that you shared through going through the thick and thin with your unit mates.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

Life-long coping and survival skills inculcated in an outdoor environment have left indelible memories. To me every activity left me with fond memories as I derive much fun in these purposeful activities. I have no particular memorable incident. I believe I am among the rare few who have had the opportunity to meet every Chief Scout during their tenure of office. Sir William Goode, Governor- General, conferred me the Queen’s Scout. Thereafter, I have received various awards from every Chief Scout since the time of President Yusof Ishak, our first President. I received the Gold Lion Award, the highest Good Service award, in 2007. I also received my 50-year Long Service award in 2005.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

There is so much potential and possibilities in life.

Every youth must be nurtured and developed in order to realise their full potentials not only in classroom setting but rather in informal educational processes which Scouting has amply provided through the Patrol System.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

To help other people and to keep the Scout law is a timely value. It requires discipline to uphold them. In the course of upholding them, I become an obedient and helpful citizen, making positive contribution to neighbourliness.

How did this "value" support you in your career/ what you are doing now?

This value supported me in my career as it takes a lot of personal discipline to maintain cordial working relationship with other colleagues.

Since my retirement from a full-time job, I have been a volunteer Group Scout Leader with Hwa Chong Scout Group.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

Through the endless fun and purposeful activities in Scouting, leadership and team work are nurtured.

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

Secondary one in 1951.

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

51st The Chinese High School Group, South Western District.

What was your last Scout "rank"?

Troop Leader

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?

No.

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

I am a passionate and determined person. Once I decide to get something, I will strive to achieve the set goal or target. Scouting is my passion and through the long scouting journey, I have kept myself abreast with current trends and interest of young people. The life-long bonding with my fellow scouts and the network established with them enable me to maintain a simple and yet interesting life style.

Lim Teck Yin

• Joined the SAF in 1980
• Rose to the rank of Brigadier General
• Represented Singapore in Water Polo from 1985 to 1995
• Retired from the SAF on 31 March 2011 and joined the Singapore Sports Council as CEO.

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

It was my CCA of choice back in secondary school. The friends I made through scouting remain friends for life.

What attracted you to Scouting?

It was the outdoor-life and skills that we could learn from our leaders and fellow scouts. I also cherished the camaraderie and the common sense of duty.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

I think it would have to be the patrol leaders selection camp. There wasn't one specific event, but the whole camp itself was exciting and the anticipation and hope kept us all on our toes.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

I believe I learned that becoming a patrol leader was not about prestige, but about the honour and duty to serve. The camp also emphasized the importance of teamwork and I remember that all those who were eventually selected were strong team players.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

"I promise to do my best, to do my duty to God and the Republic of Singapore" These two segments of the Scout Promise have stood out for me and my career has borne out how important they are to me in defining my sense of purpose.

How did this "value" support you in your career/ what you are doing now?

A journey to serve and lead is fraught with challenges and important life lessons. It is the singular focus on purpose that gives one the will to run a good race and finish well.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting to a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

Scouting is many things, but if I were to highlight one thing; it is that scouting is fun.

I learned knots and lashings that I used in the Army. I learned to rope across the Bukit Timah canal, and used the same technique in the Army's advanced obstacle course. I learned footdrill and was familiar with the commands when I enlisted into BMT. But more than all of that , I enjoyed the camaraderie and friendships that were forged in the troop.

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

1973 to 1978

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

2201

What was your last Scout "rank"?

Patrol Leader of the Panther Patrol.

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?

Um..no. :)

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

I have always been thankful for the privilege to lead teams whose objects are to be significant to the purposes we serve. I love sport and believe strongly in the power of sport to transform lives and our community.

Michael Kam

Scouting provides a wonderful fraternity

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

I was in the scout movement when I was in Secondary School.

What attracted you to Scouting?

My mom was then a scout mistress in a primary school. She introduced me to scouting, but my primary school then did not offer such a CCA (then called an ECA – extracurricular activity). I was already intrigued about it, and when I knew that my secondary school offered such an option, I jumped at the chance.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

It was a long time ago, but I was involved in one of the bigger gatherings among scouts from all around

Singapore at that time (unfortunately, I cannot recall the name of the event). But what I do recall is that I got to meet and interact with many different people, I went from station to station to compete as well as collaborate on a wide variety of challenging activities. The event was capped off with a great big campfire, with the requisite games and sing-alongs.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

I guess this event was similar to what we often do on a smaller scale within each of our own group’s capacity, except that it was organized on a larger scale.I am generally quite introverted, so this was wonderful opportunity for me to come out of the shell, so to speak, to bond, to share, and to make new friends, which I certainly did!

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

I do appreciate the motto, “Be prepared”, or at least I try to be.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

I’m a lecturer in the film and media field, and at the same time, I make short films, where I’ve been lucky to have won a few awards along the way. Short films to me are wonderful creative outlets to express my feelings and memories, as well as some of my sentiments on life. The value of “being prepared” is an important asset in whichever field you go to. For me, it means planning ahead and anticipating issues, which we can try to sidestep, but also try to be nimble to new changes. This applies to my work as a course manager for the film-making course in my school, as well as a filmmaker, when I embark on any of my creative work.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

It was an exhilarating experience for me, and I believe that anyone who joins scouting will be part of this wonderful fraternity, one from which we can draw warm memories and pick up some great life skills along the way.

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

1980 to 1984 or thereabouts.

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

Chinese High School Scout Group/Tanglin 05 under Bukit Timah District

What was your last Scout "rank"?

Patrol Leader.

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?

Nope.

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

I have a background in engineering and business, but am quite passionate about cinema. I completed a post-graduate course in film-making from Ngee Ann Polytechnic, and am currently teaching at my alma mater, while making the occasional short film. For more details, visit: http://www.np.edu.sg/fms/aboutus/staff/Pages/klh3.aspx

Natahar Bava

Singapore sprinter and rugby player

‘Scouting is an awesome journey’

He was easily one of the country’s best known sportsmen. Natahar Bava was a 200 m bronze medallist and a silver medallist as part of Singapore’s sprint relay team at the 1965 SEAP Games (what the SEA Games was called previously). He won another silver playing for the national rugby team in the 1977 SEA Games. A less known fact about Natahar was his connection with the Boy Scouts. He would proudly tell you how he led a team of Scouters to scale the 7,175 feet Gunong Tahan in Peninsular Malaysia in record time in 1971 - four days and 12 hours.

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

I was introduced and initiated into the Scout movement by a classmate in when I was in Secondary Two.

What attracted you to Scouting?

Basically, the friendliness, the caring for one another, the brotherhood and the deep sense of belonging to an association of common identity were some of the inviting factors.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

Certainly, the one memorable incident during my Scouting was the 1971 Gunong Tahan Expedition. As a group of untrained mountaineers, we were able to ascend, assault and conquer something that was not achieved by the Scouts, an exploration of the unknown.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

Teaming and team building, agreed common goals, leadership, discipline and determination, collective responsibility and contribution; and importantly, focus; these are some very essential ingredients for the success of any project.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

Certainly, all aspects of the Scout Promise and Law have percolated in my doings but, “To do my duty to God and the Republic of Singapore” must surely be the guiding principle of foundation.

How did this "value" support you in your career or what you are doing now?

Well, I was demobbed from National Service because of my commitments in representing Singapore in athletics in the mid 1960s; however, I served as a non-salaried volunteer National Rugby Coach for five years. I was an educator to the international community when I was employed by the Singapore American School for over 35 years. I rendered public service at the Bukit Ho Swee Fire on May 25 1961. Recently, I was invited by NTU/NIE to be part of their Adjunct Faculty to lecture undergraduates and graduates in rugby.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

This is an awesome, self-fulfilling odyssey; don’t deny yourself, take that ride with pride.

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

1960 to 1963 as a Scout; 1969 to 1971 as a Scout Master.

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

1960 to 1963 - 34th Perak House Sea Scouts Group, Pasir Panjang District and Raffles Scout Group, Stamford District; 1969 to 1971 - 2101 Raffles Scout Group.

What was your last Scout "rank"?

At 34th Sea Scouts Group, I was the Troop Leader. At 32 nd Raffles Group, I was assistant Scout Master. At 2101 Raffles Scout Group, I was the Scout master.

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?

Nil.

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

I was a Scout and a Scout-Master, an all-rounded sportsman, an educator, a committed coach and a friend. I am what I am today because of the environment formed by the community of Scouts, sports-loving people, teachers, friends and, most importantly, the Singaporeans around me.

Mr. Koh Kar Meng


District Commissioner - Ang Mo Kio

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

I started my teaching service in 1971 at Upper Serangoon Technical School which already had a Scout Group. In 1973, I heard from the Scout Leader that he was closing down the Scout Group. At that time, my idea of Scouting was that they often go outdoors for camping and travel out of the country for adventurous activities. Since I have already been doing outdoor activities since a young adult, I volunteered to take over as the Scout Leader even though I did not have the slightest idea about Scouting. I spent a few years managing the troop without the luxury of volunteers. During those few years, I tried to organize camps for our members to enjoy the wonderful surrounding of the outdoors.

Upper Serangoon Sec Scout Group was then under Toa Payoh District. I first met Mr. Tan Tek Tin, then the District Commissioner when I attended my first Overseas District Scout Leaders’ Retreat at PulauTioman.

What attracted you to Scouting?

I picked up my idea about Scouting and its activities mainly from the experiences of my friends who were Scouts in St. Andrew’s School and those in the teaching service. I was attracted to Scouting, for the fact that its members were part of a worldwide movement, speaking one common language. Another key attraction is the opportunity to meet and make new friends at Jamborees and International Exchanges. Another attraction related to the outdoor aspect of Scouting which was quite akin to the Outdoors and Adventure. I used to enjoy the adventure and outdoor activities, as I was introduced to it at a very early age growing up in the vicinity of farms and ponds at PotongPasir.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

During my time in Beatty Beaver Scout Group, I organized annual overseas eco-adventure trips. During one of these trips to Thailand in 2000, we had the opportunity to do a goodwill visit to Montfort College. This was arranged by the tour guide at the very last minute. The Chiang Mai Scout meeting was held on the day when we were in Chiang Mai. I did not have a proper Scout uniform for the visit. I then created one from my khaki safari shirt and shorts which was similar to that of the Thai Scouts. Everyone there accepted me as the leader of the delegation. Our Scouts enjoyed the fellowship and the warm hospitality given by the Chiang Mai Scouts very much.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

I learnt that the spirit of Scouting goes beyond our uniform. It was the camaraderie and friendship that brings people together to do the things they do, and stick to the values of the group, and act in the ways consistent with the values.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

It is “Courage in all difficulties”. It has served as my guiding principle and provided much solace in my Scouting journey thus far. In the 1990s, SSA HQ appeared to me as an ‘Ivory Tower.’ I was on my own to run the Scout unit most of the time. It was after my meeting with Mr Razak, who was then the Programme Executive, that I was availed of the many opportunities through HQ; including hosting overseas Scout delegations and organizing national Scout events.

Beatty Beaver Scout Group was requested to provide assistance in the organization of the JOTA/JOTI from 2000 - 2005, the National Pioneering Competition in 2001 and the National Scout Lore Quest in 2004. Relatively speaking, even though my Patrol Leaders and I were “green horns” in hosting such national level events for the Scouting community, we pursued ahead when given the opportunities. We derived out determination through one of the elements in the Scout Law namely “A Scout has Courage in all Difficulties”.

How did this "value" support you in your career or in what you are doing now?

With that value, I am able to stand tall even if alone and at ease to express myself. It also helps me in my teaching career.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

“Scouting is for life.” The Scout Promise and the Scout Law will hold one in good stead in the individual’s life journey.

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

I have been involved with Scouting since 1973, and returned back in 1985.Since then, I remain a registered member of the movement.

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

I first started with Upper Serangoon Technical School Scout Group. There was a short break from Scouting. I came back to active Scouting in 1985, with 1504 Beaver Scout Group at Beatty Secondary School. It was during my 20 years in Beatty Beavers, that I spent considerable memorable time in Scouting, organizing overseas adventure trips and getting to understand the movement better.

From 2008, I continued Scouting with Bishan Park Lightning Scout Group. Since 1985, there is “no turning back” on Scouting. I am passionate about Scouting till today.

What was your last Scout "rank"?

I was appointed a District Commissioner for Ang Mo Kio in 2010.

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?

No.

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

I enjoy the outdoors, nature and believe in the core values of scouting. Scouting gave me many opportunities to meet people from all over the world. I always believe in doing my best and above all, enjoy what I am doing.

Nicholas Koh
Yong Zhi

 

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

I was first introduced to Scouting when I was in primary school, and I joined as a Cadet Scout.

What attracted you to Scouting?

When I was in the Cadet Scouts, we had fun while playing games every week and we also had the opportunity to go camping. When I went on to secondary school, naturally I’d joined the Scout Troop to carry on having fun like I did in primary school.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

It was during my first job week, when I was a Cadet Scout.

It was my first experience of raising funds in exchange for jobs. Our Cadet Scout Leader had impressed upon us the importance of integrity, and we as young men should take on these jobs with pride and never ask for donations.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

That memory and experience has stuck with me over the years. I take pride in the work that I do and value the importance of hard work.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

From the Scout Promise – I promise to do my best.

How did this "value" support you in your career/ what you are doing now?

As a Senior Consultant with one of the Big 4 audit firms in Singapore, I strive to deliver my best work to my clients, and this provides me with immense pride

of what I am doing.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

Scouting is a game with a purpose that guides you to find your own way in life.

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

From 1993

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

Cuon Scout Group, Tampines District.

What was your last Scout "rank"?

As a Scout, I was the Acting Chairman for the 3rd National Rover Council. As a volunteer, I am a Venture Scout Leader.

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?

My Scouting name is “Grumbling Squirrel”.

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

A quiet guy who spends his free time outdoors - running, kayaking, trekking, camping - appreciating nature. A history lover, who enjoys experiencing different cultural heritage. He also tries to catch up on his reading whenever he can.

Noraini Mohamad


How did you first get involved in Scouting?

Appointed by Principal to Scouting CCA

What attracted you to Scouting?

It wasn’t love at first sight. I actually ‘hated’ the scouts cause during my school days I witnessed scouts launching their canoes into the canal outside my school compound, throwing their fellow buddies into the school pond, acted very rowdily...I was disgusted then. However, after completing the Advanced Course, I grew to love Scouting and its fundamentals as it was then that I experienced Scouting being practiced. Then I understood the rationale behind those ‘behaviours’.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

There were numerous incidents that left lasting memories. One of them was a trip organized in year 2000 for extension scouts - an exchange programme with scouts in Tanjung Balai, Riau, Indonesia.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

To expect the unexpected and be prepared for uncertainties.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

Duty to others

How did this "value" support you in your career/ what you are doing now?

A ‘compass’ to guide behaviour. How behaviours affect others and are affected by others.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

A guiding principle – a way of life.

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

1990

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

No troop number / Katong District

What was your last Scout "rank"?

Former National Training Commissioner (currently a Group Scout Leader)

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?

No

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

I’m by nature an introvert, but nurtured to be an extrovert, mostly attributed to Scouting. I enjoy nature and the outdoors. More of a listener than a talker but would stand up for what I believe in.

Patrick K.Y. Tan


My cousin, Dr. Henry Yeo who was already a scout at 2nd Raffles, was taking his Camp Warden badge test at Loyang and I was invited to the camp in 1960. That was how Scouting was introduced to me. The following year I joined the 133rd White Stag Group (Siglap Sec) and then joined the 12th Pajigwad (St. Patrick) a year later.

I always enjoy outdoor life and nature and that Loyang camp which I enjoyed tremendously had taught me not only many useful skills but also about the patrol system and comradeship. Those skills and values attracted me to the Movement.

My most memorable incident in my Scouting life was when I had to visit my boys camping at Jubilee Camp in Telok Paku. It was during the "confrontation year" and Anzuk forces were stationed along the beaches with sentries and guard dogs watching round the clock.

 

There were no bus service to that stretch of road. By the time I arrived at the junction of Upper Changi Road and Tanah Merah Road, the sun was down and there no street lamps throughout the whole stretch of road up to the camp. But since I promised my Scouts that I would be there, I had to keep it.

I had to walk the whole 6 kilometres praying and singing to myself just to put a brave front. I remembered the 'scout law: A Scout smiles and whistles under all difficulties'. It was so dark that I could not see my hand in front of me. So each time when a car came along with its bright light, I would watch where the roads were a few hundred metres ahead so that I would not land myself in a ditch. As soon as the car passed by, I would quickly move to the middle of the road to avoid going off the road. As soon as I got to the stretch of road that mender with the white sand beaches I felt relieved as the white beaches gave some kind of brightness to the dark scenes. Each time I passed the sentries, the guard dogs would growls.

 

 

Finally, when I arrived at the camp, it was a great relief. Of course the boys were pleased to see me. Till now I never ever forget this experience.

The Scout Law and Promise is the most important part of Scouting which I cherished and I believe these values have put me in good-stead in my personal life.

Scouting can change your outlook in life, you need to believe and experience it

I was involved in Scouting since 1960 as Senior Scout, Asst. Scout Leader, Scout Leader, Asst. Cub Master, Rover Scout Leader, Venture Scout Leader, Asst. District Commissioner, District Commissioner, Area Commissioner and presently Asst. Chief Commissioner (Resource).

12th Pajigwad Group gave me my scoutcraft name "Apenimon"(a red Indian name meaning 'trusty'. My Katong District Rover Crew gave me "Puffin". So I have two scoutcraft names.

I am a low-profile pragmatic fellow.

 

 

Peh Khoon Puay

Cub Scout Leader ( Greenridge Primary School ) District Commissioner ( Bt. Timah )

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

I was transferred to Yeung Ching School as a teacher and was tasked to do scouting as an ECA in 1977. I worked very well with the Yeung Ching Scout Open Group & we ran meetings for cubs & scouts together every Sunday.

What attracted you to Scouting?

Thanks to all the leaders in Yeung Ching Scout Open Group then. Many values and skills were taught and learnt through the fun ways. Many enjoyable activities such as camping, hiking, trekking, canoeing, mountain climbing, cycling, cooking, survival skills courses etc were organized. I was guided & motivated along the way. I always enjoyed the annual 1-week camp at Sarimbun Campsite during Christmas period.

I could still remember those old days we had to learn to lit the kerosene lamps.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

During my first camp at Sarimbun, a group of us went hiking around Lim Chu Kang area. We missed our check point & had to use all means to find our way out of the forested area. That night we had to rest at a cemetery. Of course along the way, we were showered with care & concern & encouragement.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

Scouts are brave. We have courage in all difficulties. Although some of us were quite afraid of the cemetery, we conquered the fear of staying one night there.

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

1977 to 1987, Yeung Ching Pr. School, Troop no. 2304, Tanjong Pagar/Outram District 1988 to 1997, Yangzheng Pr. School, Serangoon District 1998 till now, Greenridge Pr. School, Bt. Timah District

What was your last Scout "rank"?

Cub Scout Leader & District Commissioner

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?

No.

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

I have been in the teaching profession for 40 years. Teaching and learning is my passion. I am proud to be in the scouting family for so many years. I will continue to help and impart what I know in one way or other in the scout movement. I believe scouting helps to nurture our young minds informally, especially in character building.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

I live by the Scout Promise – To help other people & to keep the Scout Law.

How did this "value" support you in your career/ what you are doing now?

I feel happier when I am able to help others. I am glad that I do not give up easily but instead able to face difficulties and to take up the new challenges

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting to a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

Scouting will definitely enrich you & help you to become a better and more confident person.

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

1977 till now – 37 years in scouting

Roney Tan Kee Lian

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

I started scouting in 1956 in my primary school. The troop in Pearl's Hill School then was called the 16th Troop. Together with me at that time was retired High Court judge, Kan Ting Chiu. See attached photo 1.

What attracted you to Scouting?

Scouting offered me a chance to experience outdoor activities such as hiking and camping, besides learning so many new things e.g. pioneering, signalling, first aid, map reading etc. There was also the fun and pride of putting on a uniform.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

The most memorable scouting occasion was in 1963 when I received my Queen's Scout award. Unfortunately, I was then in the USA as an exchange student and did not get the chance to receive the award from the Yang Di Pertuan Agong as the rest of my Queen's scouts cohort did. Instead I was presented the award by the Scout Master of the 332nd Rainmaker Troop of Ohio, of which I was a member during my overseas attachment. See attached photo 2.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

In the process of earning the highest award in scouting from 1962 to1963, I had learnt the importance of perseverance in oneself. The various tests for the Queen's Scout badge at that time were particularly tough for a 16 year-old lad like me but through sheer perseverance, I managed to pull through all the tests and obtained by Queen's award eventually. See attached photo 3. Even today I find perseverance a very important key to one's success.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

I must say the part of the Scout Promise to help other people at all times has been engrained in me since my early scouting days. It has since been my second nature to help people whenever I can.

I have for example been serving for the last 15 years in the Medifund Committee of the Tan Tock Seng Hospital giving financial aids to poor and needy patients. I had also served on board the School Advisory Committee of the Raffles Junior College for more than 10 years providing guidance to the school and raising funds for various school projects. From 2002 to 2004 I even extended my help to Spanish nationals living in Singapore. As the Honorary Consul of Spain, I volunteered my time to see to the safety and welfare of Spanish nationals in Singapore. Since 2008, I have been back helping the scout movement in Singapore. I am presently involved in the Scout Council, Scout Guild and the Seniors-in-Scouting offering my services mainly in fund raising and promoting the good image of scouting.

How did this "value" support you in your career/ what you are doing now?

I believe that a kind heart will always be blessed. I have through the years received as much help as I have given to others.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

Scouting brings about good character development that will serve one well in life.

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

1956

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

16th Troop in City District and 32nd Raffles in Stamford District

What was your last Scout "rank"?

ASM (Assistant Scout Master) in Raffles Institution

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?

"Catfish" as I was rather good in swimming at that time.

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

I am by nature a person willing to help others. Although still working, I will not hesitate to give my time to do voluntary work if called upon. I get a sense of satisfaction for being able to help people in my own little ways.

Stephanie Seow

International Volunteer,
Singapore International Foundation

Never try, never know

Scouting taught her to be tough and never to give up. It also taught her to do her part to make the world a better place to live in. And she is doing just that now. Stephanie Seow is with the Singapore International Foundation, doing International Volunteerism. She is involved in a project she started when she was a student at the National University of Singapore. Mongolia Summer Camp (yes in Mongola) aspires to reach out to street children through the running of educational summer camps.

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

I first joined Scouting in junior college. I was "conned" into it by seniors who promoted it as a club where we could choose our own activities, plan for it and go for it.

Well, it was true indeed. I did all that and had a super lot of fun. I forged many strong friendships along the way. But in the beginning, I was not exactly told that it was Scouts until I was told to get my uniform. By then, I was already smitten by what Scouting had to offer and had thrown away all the former inhibitions and hesitations about uniformed groups.

What attracted you to Scouting?

At that time, it was the fun and the autonomy in planning and executing our own activities that we had. My Scout Group also has really charismatic leaders who believed in me, taught me and groomed me into who I am today. Because of all these learning experiences of writing proposals, planning and execution, I think it has helped me to acquire these necessary life skills at an earlier stage in life. And, of course, the feelings of camaraderie that you share through going through the thick and thin with your unit mates.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

I think a memorable Scouting event in my life will be going through Aspire Camp for the PSA (President’s Scout Award). Though I did not pass the camp, I have truly done and given my very best and I am proud of it. The camp was a very challenging one for me personally as a girl of only moderate fitness and who was also relatively new to all the tested Scouting skills. I had a lot of hesitation about the camp and did not even want to sign up but I was being psycho-ed real bad by my Scout Leader then and my friends to go and test my limits. I'm glad I eventually joined because the camp was very challenging, satisfying and empowering. Once you went through all the toughness, you knew that you could really do so much more. During the camp, I discovered that I could swim faster than some guys and that my outdoor cooking was awesome. And during a very stressful evacuation exercise, I even led the entire group of guys when no one stood up to take that role under stress.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

Never try, never know. That’s the biggest lesson gained from the camp. That our greatest enemy is really oneself. Get over that mental hurdle of "I can't do this" and we will discover that there is indeed so much potential and possibilities in life. If you have a vision and dream, go for it! Because you will never know unless you tried. Most of the time we really underestimate our own abilities. Just do your best and be unafraid to fail. Failure is just a part of the process to achieving success.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

The number one and most important thing is to do your best and to do your duty to God and the community around you. I believe the whole Movement is grounded upon making the world a better place through love and peace programmes and projects.

How did this "value" support you in your career or what you are doing now?

Starting my own initiative in Mongolia was very hard and never an easy thing to do even now. It is filled with endless challenges of liaising with people, canvassing for funds from people, facing rejections etc. There are countless times when I thought this was it, I give up. But because I have promised to do my best for the community, for the vision that I have for God and His community, I do not give up so easily. And so I have pressed on and now see the tiny baby steps of growth that the project has been making. And I hope to continue with that Scouting spirit of doing one's best and loving the community and bring it into this project and into the lives of more and more people.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

Scouting is about values and character-building through endless fun and friendships forged within a huge international family.

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

JC year 1.

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

Saint Andrews “Star” Scout Group.

What was your last Scout "rank"?

Vice-chairperson of my Venture Scout Unit. Currently the Assistant Venture Scout Leader of my Scout Group.

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?

Nope.

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

I am a passionate and determined person. And, as learned in Scouting, I hope to leave the world, the community, around me a better place. I have a passion for street children and it is my dream to help as many of them as I can to have a roof over their heads and a chance for education. I believe in always doing my best.

Roy Lai

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

Well my 2 brother were scouts! They were from Gan Eng Seng in the early 70s. It became natural that I chose scouting when it came to my turn in joining a uniform group as a CCA back then. However, what is most important to me is that I am able to contribute to scouting presently and positively.

What attracted you to Scouting?

I was the adventurous and scouting attracted me. I also like the idea of being able to own a hand knife which was allowed those days. It was also my late eldest brother which was an inspiration to me. He passed away about 10 years ago but he was cool as a scout! If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

One of the most memorable moment was when I first gotten my uniform and putting it on. The uniform was so simple but yet comfortable on me. I remember looking at it through the mirror for hours.. It was so vivid that I still remember how I looked through the mirror.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

What I had learnt? Looking back that day had thought me thumbleness, humanity and modesty. The uniform gives a sense of resilience and simplicity.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise & Law) which would stand out from the rest?

Along with my present portfolio, I feel I benefited from one very key aspect of the Scout Promise; It is “To help other people” on the top of the list. The Scout Law remains to affect me through the years.

How did this "value" support you in your career/ what you are doing now?

My current agenda in life had been to help others as a Management Consultant. Ethics in my business forms an important part of my work and relationships are key to my success.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

“Scouting is for a life time”

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

1978

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

It was so long ago and the troop has been disbanded. What is really interesting is I am with the Colugo Group Thomson, Toa Payoh District. I serve as an Adult Leader. The group has grown to a size and thanks to all the leaders of the group. It had a humble start.

What was your last Scout "rank"?

Well I was a Scout as far as I can remember. I do hold a few appointments currently though.

Did you have a nickname when you were a Scout?

No I did not.

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

I started Scouting in 1978 as a young boy. It was through the influences of my brothers. I had always been looking up to them. I left the movement after school days and never really kept in touch except for constantly remembering where SANDS House Clemenceau was. A couple of years ago, I was reunited back to scouting through two mutual fellow long time scouters – Dr Mohd Effendy and Mr. Alvin Chong. I live my new scouting life; which became a large part of my life now with many wonderful moments.

I presently hold several appointments, a Scout Council Member, Sub Committee member, VP of the Scout Guild, Member of the training team and an adult leader and Parent of the Colugo Group Thomson. I would like to highlight that one of my largest sentiment is the continuation of the Colugo group which was left with two members two years ago to over twenty members now. The Colugo is uniquely a Community Based Family Scout Group. I am proud to be a member of the group. My son Owen Lai and I are part of the group as a son and father thingy since it got started. I once again would like to thank the parents and leaders of the group for their continual support. I and my son would lastly thank our supportive wife and mummy which takes care of most of our clothing needs!

Tee Tua Ba

Former Commissioner of Police
Scouting taught him justice

Ever wondered why Tee Tua Ba became a police officer? He loved being in a uniform! That was his reason for joining the Boy Scout movement in the first place. A uniform to him means discipline, a trait which has marked his life and illustrious working career throughout, whether as a Scout, a Police Commissioner or a diplomat.

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

I joined the Scout movement as a cub scout when I was a student at Serangoon English School.

What attracted you to Scouting?

I was attracted to Scouting because of the uniform. The pride of belonging to an organisation.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

My Scout Master was a history teacher. One day, he couldn't make it to class, and as I was a Patrol Leader in the troop, he made me take over his duties and teach my class. He knew I would be able to deliver the class for him because he has seen me conduct lessons during our Scout meeting.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

The responsibilities given to me motivated me to read more and I was top in class for history because of the trust he has given me. Trust has to be built up and cannot be demanded.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

Discipline! It became my guiding principle throughout my career in the Singapore Police Force later on.

How did this "value" support you in your career/ what you are doing now?

It was tough being in the police force in the early days, with all its threats from gangsters, corruption etc. Discipline in whatever I did coupled with integrity was what saw me through those different days. The sense of justice was also important and as a Scout, this was particularly strong in me.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

To have a sense of purpose to help others especially those who are vulnerable and poor.

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

From primary to secondary school.

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

Serangoon English School.

What was your last Scout "rank"?

Troop Leader.

Prof Tommy Koh

Ambassador at Large

Scouting taught me to be kind

It is hard to find anyone who doesn't like or respect Prof Tommy Koh. This ambassador at large has a way of getting across his views, even dissenting views, in a way that does not upset his listeners.
 It is a trait he picked up when he was a scout. "Be kind to others,'' he said in his charming and unassuming style that has become a trademark of the man.
 "Kindness begets kindness. It has made me a happy and successful person. I am treated with kindness everywhere I go."



How did you first get involved in Scouting?

I joined the Scout movement when I was a student at Outram Primary School.

What attracted you to Scouting?

I was attracted to scouting because I wanted to be in a team, to spend time in the great outdoors and to learn to be tough and fearless.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

A small group of us were doing an overnight hike through a forest. We lost our way and had to spend a night in the forest.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

To be calm and collected in a crisis. To have no fear of the dark or being in a forest. To look after each other.

Looking back at your achievement through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

Be kind to others.

How did this "value" support you in your career or what you are doing now?

I think kindness begets kindness. It has made me a happy and successful person. I am treated with kindness everywhere I go.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting with a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

Scouting taught me to be a team player, to be a good leader and a good man.

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

1948 to 1957.

What were your Unit/ Troop Number and District?

I was in 02 in RI, Dolphin Patrol.

What was your last Scout "rank"?

Senior Patrol Leader

Thuraimanikam Raju

3 Generations of Scouts

How did you first get involved in Scouting?

I joined Scouting at Umar Pulavar Tamil High School in 1962. It was the only Tamil Scout Troop in Singapore.

What attracted you to Scouting?

The uniform impressed me. Furthermore the outdoor life and service to the community attracted me to the movement.

If you are to list down one memorable incident during Scouting, what would that be? What happened during that day/event?

Scouts were then known as “curi ayam”. My troop was camping in Lim Chu Kang, close to the chicken farms. Somebody or people had stolen some chicken and threw the feathers into our campsite overnight.

In the morning, the chicken farmer came to our campsite and accused us of stealing his chicken and demanded payment for them. We had no choice but to collect whatever money we had amongst ourselves and paid the farmer.

What are some of the lessons learnt from that particular day/event?

Despite being wrongly accused, we did not argue with the farmer. We decided that the integrity and image of our troop and Scouting was important. Hence we pooled in all our money despite the fact that we had none left for transport and walked all the way from Lim Chu Kang back to our school at Maxwell road.

Looking back at your achievements through the years, what do you think was one Scouting value (Scout Promise and Law) which would stand out from the rest?

To help other people.

How did this "value" support you in your career/ what you are doing now?

This value stuck with me throughout my life. I decided to join the teaching career as it was the best way to help other people. Because Scouting helped me and shaped my life, I wanted to make sure that my students had the opportunity to experience the great values it provided. Therefore when I was posted to the different schools, I volunteered myself to be the Scout Leader or opened up Scout Units in schools that did no have them.

If you were to share your experiences in Scouting to a non-scout in just one line, what would you tell him/her?

Scouting teaches you values that will help you throughout your life.

From which year were you involved in Scouting?

1962-1965: Scout Troop 1976-2006: GSL

Describe yourself in no more than 40 words

Scouting has been part of both my life and that of my family. My son is a President’s Scout and currently a Commissioner. My grandson and granddaughter are both involved in Scouting in the USA. The Scouting Spirit runs for 3 generations.

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